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IT’S ALL ABOUT RANSOMWARE: VERIZON DATA BREACH INVESTIGATIONS STUDY

Ransomware rules the cybercrime world – perhaps because ransomware attacks are often successful and financially remunerative for criminals. Ransomware features prominently in Verizon’s fresh-off-the-press 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR). As the report says, although ransomware is still a relatively new type of attack, it’s growing fast:

Ransomware was first mentioned in the 2013 DBIR and we referenced that these schemes could “blossom as an effective tool of choice for online criminals”. And blossom they did! Now we have seen this style of malware overtake all others to be the most prevalent variety of malicious code for this year’s dataset. Ransomware is an interesting phenomenon that, when viewed through the mind of an attacker, makes perfect sense.

The DBIR explains that ransomware can be attempted with little risk or cost to the attacker; can be successful because the attacker doesn’t need to monetize stolen data, only ransom the return of that data; and can be deployed across numerous devices in organizations to inflict more damage, and potentially justify bigger ransoms.

Botnets Are Also Hot

Ransomware wasn’t the only prominent attack; the 2018 DBIR also talks extensively about botnet-based infections. Verizon cites more than 43,000 breaches using customer credentials stolen from botnet-infected clients. It’s a global problem, says the DBIR, and can affect organizations in two primary ways:

The first way, you never even see the bot. Instead, your users download the bot, it steals their credentials, and then uses them to log in to your systems. This attack primarily targeted banking organizations (91%) though Information (5%) and Professional Services organizations (2%) were victims as well.

The second way organizations are affected involves compromised hosts within your network acting as foot soldiers in a botnet. The data shows that most organizations clear most bots in the first month (give or take a couple of days).

However, the report says, some bots may be missed during the disinfection process, which could result in a re-infection later.

Insiders Are Still Significant Threats

Overall, says Verizon, outsiders perpetrated most breaches, 73%. But don’t get too complacent about employees or contracts: Many involved internal actors, 28%. Yes, that adds to more than 100% because some outside attacks had inside help. Here’s who Verizon says is behind breaches:

  • 73% perpetrated by outsiders
  • 28% involved internal actors
  • 2% involved partners
  • 2% featured multiple parties
  • 50% of breaches were carried out by organized criminal groups

Ransomware rules the cybercrime world – perhaps because ransomware attacks are often successful and financially remunerative for criminals. Ransomware features prominently in Verizon’s fresh-off-the-press 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR). As the report says, although ransomware is still a relatively new type of attack, it’s growing fast:

Ransomware was first mentioned in the 2013 DBIR and we referenced that these schemes could “blossom as an effective tool of choice for online criminals”. And blossom they did! Now we have seen this style of malware overtake all others to be the most prevalent variety of malicious code for this year’s dataset. Ransomware is an interesting phenomenon that, when viewed through the mind of an attacker, makes perfect sense.

The DBIR explains that ransomware can be attempted with little risk or cost to the attacker; can be successful because the attacker doesn’t need to monetize stolen data, only ransom the return of that data; and can be deployed across numerous devices in organizations to inflict more damage, and potentially justify bigger ransoms.

Botnets Are Also Hot

Ransomware wasn’t the only prominent attack; the 2018 DBIR also talks extensively about botnet-based infections. Verizon cites more than 43,000 breaches using customer credentials stolen from botnet-infected clients. It’s a global problem, says the DBIR, and can affect organizations in two primary ways:

The first way, you never even see the bot. Instead, your users download the bot, it steals their credentials, and then uses them to log in to your systems. This attack primarily targeted banking organizations (91%) though Information (5%) and Professional Services organizations (2%) were victims as well.

The second way organizations are affected involves compromised hosts within your network acting as foot soldiers in a botnet. The data shows that most organizations clear most bots in the first month (give or take a couple of days).

However, the report says, some bots may be missed during the disinfection process, which could result in a re-infection later.

Insiders Are Still Significant Threats

Overall, says Verizon, outsiders perpetrated most breaches, 73%. But don’t get too complacent about employees or contracts: Many involved internal actors, 28%. Yes, that adds to more than 100% because some outside attacks had inside help. Here’s who Verizon says is behind breaches:

  • 73% perpetrated by outsiders
  • 28% involved internal actors
  • 2% involved partners
  • 2% featured multiple parties
  • 50% of breaches were carried out by organized criminal groups
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